Category Archives: Statistics and Data

Friday Focus on … Research Methods And Statistics

The October 2012 New Books List on the Brock Library website contains some great new titles related to research methods and statistical analysis. Each title is linked to the Library Catalogue (so you can check the circulation status before you visit the Library to sign it out) and to the publisher’s website (where you can often read sample chapters online). Enjoy!

  • Action research for business, nonprofit & public administration: a tool for complex times / E. Alana James, Tracesea Slater, and Alan Bucknam. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2012. Call No: H 62 J344 2012 (9th floor).
    • “This book covers the background, process, and tools needed to introduce and guide students through to a successful action research (AR) project. Included are how to initiate, plan, and complete AR within all types of organizations in business, nonprofit, and public administration” (publisher).
  •  When to use what research design / W. Paul Vogt, Dianne C. Gardner, Lynne M. Haeffele. New York, Guilford Press, 2012. Call No: H 62 V623 2012 (9th floor)
    • “Systematic, practical, and accessible, this is the first book to focus on finding the most defensible design for a particular research question. Thoughtful guidelines are provided for weighing the advantages and disadvantages of various methods, including qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods designs. The book can be read sequentially or readers can dip into chapters on specific stages of research (basic design choices, selecting and sampling participants, addressing ethical issues) or data collection methods (surveys, interviews, experiments, observations, archival studies, and combined methods)” (publisher).
  •  Just plain data analysis: finding, presenting, and interpreting social science data, 2nd ed. / Gary M. Klass. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2012. Call No: HA 29 K58 2012 (9th floor)
    • “Just Plain Data Analysis teaches students statistical literacy skills that they can use to evaluate and construct arguments about public affairs issues grounded in numerical evidence. The book addresses skills that are often not taught in introductory social science research methods courses and that are often covered sketchily in the research methods textbooks: where to find commonly used measures of political and social conditions; how to assess the reliability and validity of specific indicators; how to present data efficiently in charts and tables; how to avoid common misinterpretations and misrepresentations of data; and how to evaluate causal arguments based on numerical data” (publisher).
  •  Using IBM SPSS Statistics for research methods and social science statistics, 4th ed. / William E. Wagner, III. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2013. Call No: HA 32 W34 2013 (9th floor)
    • “Ideal as either a companion to a traditional statistics or research methods text or as a stand-alone guide, [this text] is a useful reference for those learning to use the SPSS software for the first time or those with only basic knowledge about SPSS. This student-friendly resource shows readers how to use images and directions drawn from SPSS Version 20 and now uses the latest version of the General Social Survey (GSS, 2010) as a secondary data set” (publisher).
  • Marketing research with SAS Enterprise guide / Kristof Coussement, Nathalie Demoulin, Karine Charry. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011. Call No: HF 5415.2 C645 2011 (9th floor)
    • “Marketing Research with SAS Enterprise Guide includes 236 screen shots to provide a detailed explanation of the SAS® Enterprise Guide software. Based on a step-by-step approach and real managerial situations, it guides the reader to an understanding of the use of statistical methods. It demonstrates ways of extracting information, collating it to provide reliable knowledge, and how to use these insights to solve day-to-day business and research problems” (publisher).
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News: Journal Citation Reports 2010 Update

The 2010 data release of  Journal Citation Reports (JCR) for the Science Edition and the Social Sciences Edition from Thomson Reuters is now available via the Brock University Library’s subscription to the JCR Database.

More information is provided in the following announcement from Thomson Reuters:

“The 2010 Journal Citation Reports® (JCR) has even more regional content than ever before! JCR provides a combination of impact and influence metrics, and millions of cited and citing journal data points that comprise the complete journal citation network of Web of ScienceSM. The 2010 JCR includes:

  • More than 10,000 of the world’s most highly cited, peer reviewed journals in 238 disciplines
  • Nearly 2,500 publishers and 84 countries represented
  • Over 1,300 regional journals
  • 1,075 journals receiving their first Journal Impact Factor

The recognized authority for evaluating journals, JCR presents quantitative data that supports a systematic, objective review of the world’s leading journals.”

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OECD iLibrary Statistics Database

Brock University now subscribes to the Statistics portion of the OECD iLibrary database.

This database contains well known datasets from the OECD including:

  • Main Economic Indicators
  • OECD Economic Outlook statistics and projections
  • International Trade by Commodity
  • and much more.

You can used the OECD.Stat tool to extract data from across many OECD databases as Excel or CSV files.

Also included are key tables on a wide variety of topics including agriculture, development, economics, education, employment, environment, finance, health, science and technology, social issues, taxation, and trade.

In addition to the Statistics package, you can browse abstracts and selected full text of other content in the Books, Papers, Factbook and Glossaries sections of the OECD iLibrary. Watch for the yellow “happy face” icon 🙂 which indicates when Brock University has access to specific content.

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